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A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol is a wonderful retelling of a classic. Smaller children might get scared but anyone older than ten is bound to enjoy it.

  | March 07, 2014 09:48 IST

Rating:

A Christmas Carol
  • Genre:
    Fantasy/Animation/Drama
  • Cast:
    Jim Carrey, Steve Valentine and Sage Ryan
  • Director:
    Robert Zemeckis
  • Writer:
    Charles Dickens
In A Christmas Carol, director Robert Zemeckis brings motion capture animation and 3D to Charles Dickens? classic 1843 story. The result is an exhilarating, moving film that both children and adults will love.

Jim Carrey plays seven roles in the film. The most significant one is that of Ebeneezer Scrooge, the legendary miser who changes his ways after being visited by the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future.

Carrey is barely recognizable here?not just because of the animation but also because he lets go of his typical rubber-limbed antics. He is wonderfully tragic as the flint-hearted and pathetically lonely man.

A Christmas Carol begins with an exhuberant title sequence, in which the camera swoops down across the city of London. We catch small moments of joy and festivity as the city readies for Christmas but the cheer sours with the appearance of Scrooge. This inventive sequence alone is worth the price of the ticket.

The ghosts are also nicely done. I particularly liked Christmas past who is a pixie-ish flame. Despite the cutting edge technology, Zemeckis stays faithful to the book.

All the best loved lines are here including Scrooge?s Bah Humbug and Tiny Tim?s prayer: "God Bless Us, Everyone".

The film| falters in the third act in which Scrooge meets with the ghost of Christmas future. Here Zemeckis constructs an overblown show-piece horse-chase that would be more at home in an action film. But this is a minor quibble.

A Christmas Carol is a wonderful retelling of a classic. Smaller children might get scared but anyone older than ten is bound to enjoy it.

Go and don?t forget to take some tissues.
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