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HomeMovie Reviews

Contract

  | March 07, 2014 09:48 IST
Contract
  • Genre:
    Action
  • Cast:
    Adhvik Mahajan
  • Director:
    Ram Gopal Varma
Contract is directed, or misdirected, as it were, by Ram Gopal Varma. The movie belongs to the same pet genre that Varma pioneered and spawned in the late '90s: The Bombay underworld. Except, the Mafia, based outside the city limits now, is divided into two separate factions. One that is attached to an Islamic terror group. The other, a front for India's internal espionage service, the Intelligence Bureau. Both the groups, the film argues, are equally diminished in their powers. Though both have polar opposite bosses. In this crossfire of a post-93 Bombay, and a post 9/11 world, Varma spins a story of an ex-Army commando, that's an Abhishek Bachchan wannabe Adhvik Mahajan. He loses his family to a bomb attack. A senior police officer plants this daredevil as an informer into the Islamic terrorist outfit. No one knows of this operation but that officer. The commando, with the help of that cop, wins the trust and rises up in the group. The premise is vaguely reminiscent of the Salim-Javed script Don. The film itself is extra loaded with one Salim-Javed kind of one-liner after another. But that will hardly bother you here. What will are actually the characters. In a supposedly realistic film, you're unlikely to come across that many caricatures. One of the dons, based loosely on Chhota Rajan, lives in a yacht and jumps on his trampoline. He has a screechy wife, tearing your ears. The other don, roughly Dawood Ibrahim has a den where the only thing missing is Feroze Khan's tiger. The encounter specialist cop talks to a picture of Mallika Sherawat, when he doesn't get chased naked on the street. The quiet hero finds a heroine. All they keep sharing between each other are secrets; whatever that means. The fat female police commissioner chomps on toffees, while her subordinate OD's on coffee. The terrorist Osama with a gang of 10 blurts his usual gibberish. Eventually, if all of them are killed off, you wouldn't care. All of them, as it turns out, are actually killed off. And you're really not concerned. In fact it matters even less if our hero goes back to the police, gets caught among the dons or becomes one itself. You don't fear for his life. You do fear in the end that the filmmaker has even a sequel in his mind!
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